Medicare at 62 | Options & Information

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Medicare at 62?

Many people are familiar with Social Security rules that allow for enrollment at age 62, albeit at a lower rate of benefits. This early enrollment in Social Security has led people to ask, “Can I get Medicare at 62?” The short answer is: It depends. The information below outlines who gets to enroll in Medicare early and at what age.

The Typical Enrollment Age for Medicare

The typical age for enrollment in original Medicare Parts A and B is age 65 but people have an enrollment window that begins begins before their 65th birthday. In the three months prior to the month in which a 65th birthday occurs until the third month after the month in which a 65th birthday occurs, a person may enroll in original Medicare. This seven-month window is known as the Initial Enrollment Period.

Initial Enrollment Period
3 Months Before the Month You Turn 652 Months Before the Month You Turn 651 Month Before the Month You Turn 65The Month You Turn 651 Month After the Month You Turn 652 Months After the Month You Turn 653 Months After the Month You Turn 65

In most cases Medicare benefits don’t become active until the first day of the month a person turns 65, assuming enrollment has taken place before that month.

Who Gets to Enroll Early in Medicare

Even though Medicare is primarily associated with the elderly, approximately 19% of Medicare beneficiaries were under the age of 65 in 2012.[1] However, early enrollment is not limited to age 62.

People who qualify for Medicare under the age of 65 suffer from a medical disability. The disabled automatically get Part A and Part B after 24 months of disability benefits from Social Security or certain disability benefits from the Railroad Retirement Board. People suffering from ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also called Lou Gehrig’s disease) automatically get Medicare Part A and Part B the month disability benefits begin from Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board.

Am I eligible for Medicare if I have End Stage Renal Disease?

People with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) can get Part A and Part B no matter how old they are if their kidneys no longer work and they need regular dialysis or require a kidney transplant. They, however, must meet one of the following criteria:

  • They’ve worked the required amount of time under Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board (RRB)
  • They’re getting or are eligible for Social Security or Railroad Retirement benefits
  • They’re either a spouse or a dependent child of a person who has worked the required amount of time to be eligible for Medicare or who is getting Social Security or Railroad Retirement benefits

If I’m Disabled & on Medicare, Will I lose Medicare if I Return to Work?

People can keep their Medicare insurance coverage for as long as they are medically disabled. If they return to work but are still disabled, they won’t have to pay your Part A premium for the first 8 ½ years. After that, they’ll have to paythe Part A premium.

Sources:

1http://kff.org/medicare/state-indicator/distribution-of-medicare-beneficiaries-by-eligibility-category-2/

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